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Thursday, August 23rd, 2018

The Perry Report – Feature Story

BRINGING YOUR HOME DESIGN DREAMS TO LIFE: INTERVIEW WITH ASID CEO RANDY FISER

From the Luxury Portfolio Blog at LuxuryPortfolio.com

Without a doubt, Randy Fiser, Hon. FASID, understands the impact of great design. As CEO of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) for the past six years, Fiser works with interior designers across North America as a leading voice describing the power of design to positively impact people’s lives. We sat down with him to discuss the benefits of hiring a design professional to maximize a space and improve an occupant’s health and well-being.

Q. What are the most important things consumers need to know about the interior design profession?

A. The interior design profession is a robust occupation in which designers capture a client’s lifestyle and expectations to execute a project to maximize functionality. A good designer also has the ability to build a rapport with the client, ensuring that their vision for the home comes to life. In addition, they also need to be very familiar with materials that are aesthetically pleasing but also healthy and sustainable. Interior designers must understand people as much as they know the practice of design. This is beyond residential. Interior designers build spaces for healthcare, workplace, education, hospitality, and all other places where we live, work, play, and heal.

Q. With countless resources on the Internet for consumers to gain access to design tools and products, how does the design professional navigate the relationship with the consumer?

Without a doubt, Randy Fiser, Hon. FASID understands the impact of great design. As CEO of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) for the past six years, Fiser works with interior designers across North America as a leading voice describing the power of design to positively impact people’s lives. We sat down with him to discuss the benefits of hiring a design professional to maximize a space and improve an occupant’s health and well-being.

Q. What are the most important things consumers need to know about the interior design profession?

A. The interior design profession is a robust occupation in which designers capture a client’s lifestyle and expectations to execute a project to maximize functionality. A good designer also has the ability to build a rapport with the client, ensuring that their vision for the home comes to life. In addition, they also need to be very familiar with materials that are aesthetically pleasing but also healthy and sustainable. Interior designers must understand people as much as they know the practice of design. This is beyond residential. Interior designers build spaces for healthcare, workplace, education, hospitality, and all other places where we live, work, play, and heal.

Q. With countless resources on the Internet for consumers to gain access to design tools and products, how does the design professional navigate the relationship with the consumer?

A. Consumers want to work with a professional that taps into their personal desires for a space to better reflect (in the home) who they are as people and can have a positive effect on their health and well-being. Online services may not be as personal, making it difficult to design a space that will have a positive impact on the lives of people in the space. These services may provide some materials to consumers, but not as much of the personal rapport that they would receive when working directly with a design professional. Developing a relationship with your designer is important in reflecting yourself in a space. Much of what an interior designer does is create a space that is unique to the owner.

Q. How often do you see designers partnering with real estate professionals to benefit the buyer and the seller?

A. Closer relationships between agents and designers can help a client navigate the design process and ensure that when it is time to sell the home, the space is marketable to new buyers. I have seen some real estate agents take designers to properties to ensure that the buyers make the space their own but right now, I don’t think it happens enough. Through a partnership with an interior designer and a real estate agent, new owners can create a space that is personal and functional.

Q. What are some examples of “good design” where the design professional added unique and demonstrable value?

A. One example is customization. There are always mass-produced pieces that you can purchase and add, however, if the client wants something truly unique like a custom wall piece or a need for a smaller sofa, that should be made for them. These customized elements add unique value to the home and bring joy to the owner. Another example of good design is incorporating elements that improve your health and well-being. Everything from circadian lighting, (systems that mimic the body’s natural biological cycles) to biophilia (the connection between humans and every living system) are environmental improvements that can positively impact a homeowner’s well-being.

Q. How can consumers know that the design professional they commission is an experienced professional?

A. One of the ways to know someone is qualified is through certification. ASID offers several categories of membership so that consumers know that their designer is an experienced professional. Allied ASID membership is open to members who have completed an interior design degree program from an accredited institution, Associate members have a minimum of 6 years of experience in interior design, and the Professional ASID membership is members who successfully completed examination to show that they understand technical issues that support the health, safety, and welfare of the people within a space. P&C

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